Tag Archives: #fashionlife

Our Fav’s from Marc Jacobs NYFW

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For showing the audience what a Fashion Show is truly about, the inspiring Marc Jacobs stood out with his plush pink shag carpet that took up the entire runway. If this pop of pink wasn’t enough for an entrance, Jacobs also had Beats by Dre Headphones plugged into the seats. As each model walked down the runway, each guest heard random everyday sounds as well as the models walking on different textures, with a thoroughly explanation of what was going on during the catwalks. The clothes were noted for their fun and theatrical styles with louche military. A complete opposite of the 50 & 60’s pink shag to make a perfect balance on the runway.

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Marc Jacobs also displayed some amazing color palettes at this year’s NYFW. Jacobs showed diversity from dove gray, nudes, camel tones, rich blues, and dark forest military greens. He showed over 50 ways to wear a field jacket though a number of different combinations such as: swing dresses, cinched satin minis, ball-beaded shirt dresses, day-time party dresses, pajama pants, tank dresses, and evening columns with peek-a-boo slits as well as cropped tops with long, silk skirts.

Not to mention just how AMAZING these field jackets actual looked. The jackets were designed in extra extra large proportions and with silk pockets. Jacobs carried the silk pocket inspiration to cute little sleeveless mini-dresses worn with cross-body bags, and magenta backpacks in silk nylon.

Marc Jacobs displayed modern, feminine utility, and while the stage and the models ‘ spare, homogenous beauty look. Every model had black, shaggy, and edgy bobs as well as ZERO make up! These beauty look’s suggest something severe, the clothes were very wearable. And that’s a pretty great way to end the New York season.

What was your favorite designer from NYFW?

Xx, B

 

NYFW with Sarah Owen

NYFW ALERT: From getting street style papped to sharing a cab with Karlie Kloss (sort of), Youth Editor Sarah Owen shares her experience of the Spring/Summer 2016 shows!

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Here’s what she had to say!

Fashion week in September always beats the February season – think slushy snow and Arctic temperatures versus summer heat and open-air venues – so I was naturally excited for the arrival of the spring/summer 2016 shows.

Weather aside, it was a relief knowing NYFW was venturing downtown and saying adieu to the Lincoln Center, which everyone from designers to editors had begun to disdain. Between attending shows, live-tweeting, trending collection images, juggling social media and guest-blogging for Collective Hub, this season delivered some memorable moments (and tips!). And here they are…

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DKNY x Public School: One of my top shows, perhaps because I gave in to some of the buzz (ICYMI: Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell were recently appointed as the new creative directors). And it all made sense. The show felt very New York, but not so much DKNY. The guys elevated the line, bringing both downtown and uptown elements, and reworked them into a loosely tailored collection of deconstructed power suiting and school uniforms #success.

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Subway vs Taxis: Don’t let those heels fool you. To those sitting at home clicking through street style slideshows it may look like taxis are the only way to go. In reality, the vast number of backed-up black SVU’s waiting outside a show may just mean you’ll be late to your next. Many a time I’ve sat across from top models (think Julia Nobis and Hanne Gabe Odiele) on the subway, because they definitely can’t be late for their call time, and they’re real people too.

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Refinery29’s #29Rooms: I attended the press preview (thank god I did – apparently there were two hour queues when it opened over the weekend). The team at R29 really knocked this one out of the park and it was probably the best way to start NYFW. An immersive 29-room funhouse intended to be a social gift to viewers who come visit and participate in spaces created by artists such as Petra Collins and Shantell Martin. My favourite was probably Print All Over Me’s aMaze room, featuring a labyrinth of bold patterned rooms that I fittingly dubbed 29Shrooms.

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Frame Denim: I’m a sucker for American classics and this season’s presentation was exactly that – wearable, digestible, and polished. The team gifted all editors with a pair of Frame denim jeans, which is smart thinking given the success of the Adidas Stan Smith sneaker they gave out to editors a few seasons ago. Side note: after the show, I ended up jumping in the taxi Karlie Kloss was getting out of and my colleague began laughing after I sat in a pile of her sweat. I get it! The girl’s running around, it’s hot as can be, and those leather (probably pleather) seats aren’t so bare leg friendly.

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Art Happenings: I make the most of the shows being held over on the west side to pop into a few of my favourite galleries in Chelsea, because #Instagram and #ArtLover. I was lucky enough to catch Roy Lichtenstein’s Greene Street Mural recreation at Gagosian Gallery right before dashing to the Tibi show.

Xx, B

 

Artsy Fashion

Is this the hottest look in Brazil?

It combines art and style in a way that’s reminiscent of Andy Warhol’s POP ART and the trend is only going to get bigger. Legendary Sao Paolo fashion consultant and journalist Paula Martins reports.

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Fashion and art come together in a tight bond to create a trend that has taken over the streets and runways of the Brazilian fashion universe.

Season by season, fashion movements hardly ever happen in an isolated way. Music, art and any manifestation of daily life come as inspiration for stylists who gather from these sources to create their collections. It was in the late 1960’s, with Andy Warhol’s POP ART that this had its timely start.

The massification of art allowed for the participation of fashion, making a success of this partnership that has been appearing in both national and international fashion weeks, and which now has become relevant to an ever-growing market in Brazil.

The question is: how to adapt all this information and create clothes that inspire desire and will become trends here? That’s where every brand’s talent must understand and know – without any doubt – who their customer is, to choose which artistic characteristics will work for them.

Nowadays, the term “ARTSY” synthesizes well this partnership of art and fashion. Differently from previous approaches, now art presents itself in a literal, unrestricted, inhibited way. Prints and colors possess urban characteristics and contemporary shapes, not only in conceptual fashion, but also in casual looks for daily life.

The Brazilian cultural scene is considered fruitful in this new market. The costumes from each region and state enable brands to take advantage of local talents, showing the world Brazilian daily life through clothes.

The return to our origins, going after specific characteristics – such as the handiwork of the “rendeiras”, lace makers from the city of Fortaleza, in the State of Ceará, or such as the street art of São Paulo’s graffiti artists – solidifies the identity of Brazilian fashion, rousing the interest of national brands in their own country. Imagine this scene propagated throughout 26 states, in which each has its own talents, creating artistic material unrestrictedly, just by exercising their creativity.

Simultaneously we also have the Brazilian market recognising these works and desiring to consume national art through clothes. Men and women have grasped the need of not only following international trends, but of having in their own image an identity which can be recognized as personal and untransferable.

All that aligned to a contemporary outlook that could even be exported to other countries. Production chains like weaving and manufacturing benefit from this new era and see in a positive light this union of fashion and art in Brazil.